"Sandals" redirects here. For the Caribbean luxury resorts operator, see Sandals Resorts. For the Holy relic at Prüm Abbey, see Sandals of Jesus Christ. For other uses, see Sandal (disambiguation).
A pair of sandals being worn.

Sandals are an open type of footwear, consisting of a sole held to the wearer's foot by straps going over the instep and, sometimes, around the ankle. Sandals can also have a heel. While the distinction between sandals and other types of footwear can sometimes be blurry (as in the case of huaraches—the woven leather footwear seen in Mexico, and peep-toe pumps), the common understanding is that a sandal leaves most of the upper part of the foot exposed. People may choose to wear sandals for several reasons, among them comfort in warm weather, economy (sandals tend to require less material than shoes and are usually easier to construct), and as a fashion choice.

Usually, people wear sandals in warmer climates or during warmer parts of the year in order to keep their feet cool and dry. The risk of developing athlete's foot is lower than with enclosed shoes, and the wearing of sandals may be part of the treatment regimen for such an infection.


Esparto sandals from the 6th or 5th millennium BC found in Spain.
Rubber flip-flops are amongst one of the most common types of sandals in the world.

The oldest known sandals (and the oldest known footwear of any type) were discovered in Fort Rock Cave in the U.S. state of Oregon; radiocarbon dating of the sagebrush bark from which they were woven indicates an age of at least 10,000 years.[1]

The word sandal is of Greek origin. The ancient Greeks distinguished between baxeae (sing. baxea), a sandal made of willow leaves, twigs, or fibres worn by comic actors and philosophers; and the cothurnus, a boot sandal that rose above the middle of the leg, worn principally by tragic actors, horsemen, hunters, and by men of rank and authority. The sole of the latter was sometimes made much thicker than usual by the insertion of slices of cork, so as to add to the stature of the wearer.[2]

The ancient Egyptians wore sandals made of palm-leaves and papyrus.[3] They are sometimes observable on the feet of Egyptian statues and in reliefs, being carried by sandal-bearers. According to Herodotus, sandals of papyrus were a part of the required and characteristic dress of the Egyptian priests.


Grecian sandals for men

A sandal may have a sole made from rubber, leather, wood, tatami or rope. It may be held to the foot by a narrow thong that generally passes between the first and second toe, or by a strap or lace, variously called a latchet, sabot strap or sandal, that passes over the arch of the foot or around the ankle. A sandal may or may not have a heel (either low or high) or heel strap.


Yoga sandals have thongs that pass between all of the toes.
High-heeled sandals
Sport sandals. Popular for outdoor activities.
Spiked sandals (used by devotees) in a museum, Sri Lanka

Among the many kinds of sandals are:

See also

Notes and references

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sandals.
  1. Robbins, William G. (2005). Oregon: This Storied Land. Oregon Historical Society Press. ISBN 978-0875952864.
  2. Serv. in Virg. Ed. II. cc. (cited by Yates)
  3. Wilkinson, Manners and Customs vol. iii. p. 336. (cited by Yates)
  4. Crochet Sandals
  5. "Sandal and Footwear Technology - SOURCE Hydration & Sandals". Retrieved 23 November 2016.
  6. DDR Museum: Sandals in GDR so called Jesuslatschen
  7. Museum, Bata Shoe. "All About Shoes". Retrieved 23 November 2016.
  8. "closed-toe sandals". Retrieved 23 November 2016.

External links

Look up sandal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
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